FanDuel, DraftKings fight threatened shutdown in New York

By Nate Raymond NEW YORK (Reuters) – Daily fantasy sports companies DraftKings and FanDuel urged a New York judge on Wednesday to spare them from a potentially crippling shutdown in one of their top markets by ruling that their contests do not constitute illegal gambling. “Chance pervades fantasy sports,” McGee said.

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DraftKings hires Exiger to review financial controls, compliance

Daily fantasy sports company DraftKings said on Tuesday it hired regulatory risk and compliance firm Exiger to conduct a review of its financial, operational, compliance and risk controls, as the company and its top competitor, FanDuel, have come under fire from state and federal regulators.

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Sassy woman or machine? Tech giants divided over digital assistants

By Julia Love and Yasmeen Abutaleb SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – When users ask Siri, Apple’s digital assistant, what she likes to drink, she is quick with an answer. What's your favorite drink?” As the tech giants race to build ever better artificial intelligence platforms, they are obsessing over the nuances of their digital assistants' personalities.

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Massachusetts to ban fantasy sports for people under 21

Massachusetts would prohibit people under the age of 21 from playing paid fantasy sports games under a proposed set of regulations for the fast-growing, multibillion-dollar industry laid out on Thursday by state Attorney General Maura Healey. The proposals would also ban fantasy competitions based on college sports, prohibit promotions of paid fantasy sports on high school and college campuses and bar professional athletes, agents and others connected to pro sports from taking part in paid fantasy contests related to their sports. The fantasy sports business, led by DraftKings and FanDuel, has drawn increasing regulatory scrutiny over the past few weeks with state regulatory officials debating whether the paid daily games are gambling.

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Matchmaking seen as potential game changer in online job search market

By Patricia Reaney NEW YORK (Reuters) – Just as social media changed how people find love and marriage, with research showing about 22 percent of U.S. couples now meet online, an Internet dating website is betting its matchmaking techniques will help people find the perfect job. In March 2016, eHarmony plans to launch Elevated Careers, an online employment service that will put the compatibility matching techniques it has used in pairing couples to the test in the career market.

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